“Keeping Our Teens On Track” Talk or Workshop

Carlile KOTOT handout 13 pages.

Keeping Our Teens On Track

“Keeping Our Teens On Track” Handouts for Heather’s Workshop

My dedication to helping parents, teachers, therapists and mentors being able to utilize the superlative tools we have created today is relentless and passionate. Please let me know if I can assist you and your programs in any way: contact me for a phone call, email, Skype, Google+ Hangout, distance learning for your college class, conference or association, etc.

Keeping Our Teens On Track Video 

Keeping Our Teens On Track

Keeping Our Teens On Tra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over and over I am asked to teach my program “Keeping Our Teens On Track.” And, as I write this, I look forward to a Post Conference half-day workshop with my colleagues at the Texas Counseling Association Annual Conference in Galveston.  I am grateful for the opportunity to engage other counselors in the conversation of solving the puzzle of how we mentor parents, teachers, coaches and teenagers to implement what we know will  grow happy, healthy and competent people who know who they are and what they stand for in life. This material was developed when I had the assistance of Cheanay Pritchett in her final semester Internship with me from the University of North Texas. Cheanay finished her degree from UNT in Wellness Promotion with choosing to help me research and design this body of work.

I continue to be appalled, puzzled and devoted to this serious subject. And, if you have a new source, a  link,  an opinion, a method or a question about how we keep our teens on track in developing themselves vs getting lost in anger/defiance, dependent immature relationships or apathy/depression, please engage me in conversation. We can’t let this go. About 9,000 of our students drop out of high school daily.

Here are the recent findings:

TODAY’S RESEARCH:

2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance

Results from the 2011 national YRBS indicated that many high school students are engaged in priority health-risk behaviors associated with the leading causes of death among persons aged 10–24 years in the United States. During the 30 days before the survey,

32.8% of high school students nationwide had texted or e-mailed while driving,
38.7% had drunk alcohol, and
23.1% had used marijuana.
During the 12 months before the survey,
32.8% of students had been in a physical fight,
20.1% had ever been bullied on school property, and
7.8% had attempted suicide.

Many high school students nationwide are engaged in sexual risk behaviors associated with unintended pregnancies and STDs, including HIV infection.
Nearly half (47.4%) of students had ever had sexual intercourse,
33.7% had had sexual intercourse during the 3 months before the survey (i.e., currently sexually active), and
15.3% had had sexual intercourse with four or more people during their life.
Among currently sexually active students,
60.2% had used a condom during their last sexual intercourse.

Results from the 2011 national YRBS also indicate many high school students are engaged in behaviors associated with the leading causes of death among adults aged ≥25 years in the United States. During the 30 days before the survey,
18.1% of high school students had smoked cigarettes and
7.7% had used smokeless tobacco.
During the 7 days before the survey,
4.8% of high school students had not eaten fruit or drunk 100% fruit juices and
5.7% had not eaten vegetables.
Nearly one-third (31.1%) had played video or computer games for 3 or more hours on an average school day.

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance — United States, 2011